NeuroNex Neurotheory Workshop Series (NeWS)

A hands-on workshop for PhD students and Postdocs who want to learn new and advanced techniques in modelling and data analysis. Open to experimentalists and theorists, funded by NSF's NeuroNex initiative.

RSVP here (first come first serve)

Spring 2020 Workshop Schedule

1/22/2020, 130pm-530pm: Ella Batty and Matt Whiteway (RSVP NOW!)
BehaveNet: nonlinear embedding and Bayesian neural decoding of behavioral videos

2/19/2020, 130pm-530pm: Shreya Saxena
Localized semi-nonnegative matrix factorization (LocaNMF) of widefield calcium imaging data

3/18/2020, 130pm-530pm: Minni Sun
Understanding the functional and structural differences across excitatory and inhibitory neurons

4/22/2020, 130pm-530pm: Fabio Stefanini
A distributed neural code in the dentate gyrus and CA1

These workshops are intended for PhD students and postdocs who want to learn new and advanced techniques in modelling and data analysis.  During the workshops, attendees will hear about a research project (published or pre-print) followed by a hands-on tutorial. 

Workshops will include a presentation, a tutorial session and lots of time and space for unfiltered in-depth discussions and data hacking sessions.  If possible, participants are therefore encouraged to bring their own data so that they can apply the learned techniques on their own research projects.  

In order to maximize in-depth discussions and hands-on interaction within the group, we are limiting the group size on a first come first serve basis. A limited budget to cover short-travel expenses (e.g., train rides from the tri-state area) is also available. Interested participants should fill out this form.

We encourage participation from female scientists and those belonging to underrepresented minority groups.

Questions?  Email nnxnews@gmail.com

The Spring 2020 workshop series will be held at Columbia University's Jerome L Green Science Center.

Organizers: Mario Dipoppa, Rainer Engelken, Ramon Nogueira, and Fabio Stefanini.

NeWS is funded by NSF's NeuroNex Award DBI-170739.